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What are the Applicable Disputes?
How to Demonstrate the Registrant's Rights to and Legitimate Interests in the Domain Name?

What Does a Complainant have to Prove?

The Complainant has to adduce evidence of Registration and Use in Bad Faith.

For the purposes of rules in the DRP, the following circumstances, in particular but without limitation, if found by an Arbitration Panel to be present, shall be evidence of the registration and use of a domain name in bad faith:

(i) circumstances indicating that the Registrant has registered or the Registrant has acquired the domain name primarily for the purpose of selling, renting, or otherwise transferring the domain name registration to the Complainant who is the owner of the trademark or service mark or to a competitor of that Complainant, for valuable consideration in excess of the Registrant's documented out-of-pocket costs directly related to the domain name; or

(ii) the Registrant has registered the domain name in order to prevent the owner of the trademark or service mark from reflecting the mark in a corresponding domain name, provided that the Registrant has engaged in a pattern of such conduct; or

(iii) the Registrant has registered the domain name primarily for the purpose of disrupting the business of a competitor; or

(iv) by using the domain name, the Registrant has intentionally attempted to attract, for commercial gain, Internet users to the Registrant's web site or other on-line location, by creating a likelihood of confusion with the Complainant's mark as to the source, sponsorship, affiliation, or endorsement of the Registrant's web site or location or of a product or service on the Registrant's web site or location.